OUR PRODUCTS

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ASH

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Pros: A light colored wood giving a distinct appearances, with a soft creamy glow. Wears very well under normal foot traffic.
Cons: Difficult to match unity in color of boards especially in lower grades, tending to increase amount of wood needed for job. Difficult to hide nail holes.
Color: Heartwood is light tan to dark brown; sapwood is creamy white. Similar to white oak but more yellow.
Grain: Bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional wavy figuring, and can have strong contract in grain in plain-sawn boards.
Availability: Moderately available
Hardness: Slightly harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: Elastic, hard, excellent shock resistance.
Workability:
Sawing: Good
Nailing: Good holding; good resistance to splitting
Sanding: Satisfactorily
Finishing: Stains well, no known finishing problems.





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BEECH

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Pros: A light colored wood giving a distinct appearances, with a soft creamy glow. Wears very well under normal foot traffic.
Cons: Difficult to match unity in color of boards especially in lower grades, tending to increase amount of wood needed for job. Difficult to hide nail holes.
Color: Heartwood is light tan to dark brown; sapwood is creamy white. Similar to white oak but more yellow.
Grain: Bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional wavy figuring, and can have strong contract in grain in plain-sawn boards.
Availability: Moderately available
Hardness: Slightly harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: Elastic, hard, excellent shock resistance.
Workability:
Sawing: Good
Nailing: Good holding; good resistance to splitting
Sanding: Satisfactorily
Finishing: Stains well, no known finishing problems.





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BIRCH

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(Panga-panga, Millettia spp.) Pros: Great for feature strips.
Cons: Limited availability and expensive.
Color: Heartwood is yellow-brown when freshly cut,, turning dark brown to almost black with alternate layers of light and dark. Sapwood is yellowish-white and clearly demarcated from heartwood.
Grain: Straight when quartered; coarse texture.
Availability: Limited
Hardness: Quite a bit harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: average.
Workability:
Sawing: Difficult, carbide tooling recommended.
Nailing: Good
Sanding: Satisfactorily
Finishing: Some solvent-based stains do not dry well.





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DOUGLAS FIR

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Pros: A light colored wood giving a distinct appearances, with a soft creamy glow. Wears very well under normal foot traffic.
Cons: Difficult to match unity in color of boards especially in lower grades, tending to increase amount of wood needed for job. Difficult to hide nail holes.
Color: Heartwood is light tan to dark brown; sapwood is creamy white. Similar to white oak but more yellow.
Grain: Bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional wavy figuring, and can have strong contract in grain in plain-sawn boards.
Availability: Moderately available
Hardness: Slightly harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: Elastic, hard, excellent shock resistance.
Workability:
Sawing: Good
Nailing: Good holding; good resistance to splitting
Sanding: Satisfactorily
Finishing: Stains well, no known finishing problems.





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HEART PINE - ANTIQUE

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(White) (Quercus alba) Pros: The best value for your money. Very hard and durable also can be stained in a multiple of colors.
Cons: Slightly dark in coloring, can have large contrast in color from board to board especially in the lower grades.
Color: Heartwood is light brown; some boards may have a pinkish tint or a slight grayish cast. Sapwood is white to cream.
Grain: Open, with longer rays than red oak. Occasional crotches, swirls and burls. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger oak, tiger rays, or butterflies.
Availability: Commodity item, available in ALL types, styles and sizes of flooring.
Hardness: Slightly harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: More durable than red oak. Tannic acid in the wood protects it from fungi and insects.
Workability:
Sawing: good
Nailing: good
Sanding: satisfactory
Finishing: Absorbs finishes more evenly than red oak. Does NOT bleach well.





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MAPLE

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(Panga-panga, Millettia spp.) Pros: Great for feature strips.
Cons: Limited availability and expensive.
Color: Heartwood is yellow-brown when freshly cut,, turning dark brown to almost black with alternate layers of light and dark. Sapwood is yellowish-white and clearly demarcated from heartwood.
Grain: Straight when quartered; coarse texture.
Availability: Limited
Hardness: Quite a bit harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: average.
Workability:
Sawing: Difficult, carbide tooling recommended.
Nailing: Good
Sanding: Satisfactorily
Finishing: Some solvent-based stains do not dry well.





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OAK (RED)

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(Red) (Quercus spp.) Pros: One of the best values for your money. Stains very well. Very durable. Cons: Not very individual.
Color: Heart and sapwood are similar with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white.
Grain: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quarter-sawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger oak, tiger rays or butterflies.
Availability: Commodity item available in ALL types, styles and sizes of flooring.
Hardness: Stiff & dense, resist wear, less durable than white oak.
Workability:
Sawing: above average
Nailing: good
Sanding: satisfactorily, better than white oak
Finishing: Strong stain contrast, because of pores.





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OAK (WHITE)

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(White) (Quercus alba) Pros: The best value for your money. Very hard and durable also can be stained in a multiple of colors.
Cons: Slightly dark in coloring, can have large contrast in color from board to board especially in the lower grades.
Color: Heartwood is light brown; some boards may have a pinkish tint or a slight grayish cast. Sapwood is white to cream.
Grain: Open, with longer rays than red oak. Occasional crotches, swirls and burls. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger oak, tiger rays, or butterflies.
Availability: Commodity item, available in ALL types, styles and sizes of flooring.
Hardness: Slightly harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: More durable than red oak. Tannic acid in the wood protects it from fungi and insects.
Workability:
Sawing: good
Nailing: good
Sanding: satisfactory
Finishing: Absorbs finishes more evenly than red oak. Does NOT bleach well.





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WALNUT

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(Jatoba) Pros: Can be used over radiant heat very stable with humidity changes. One of the hardest wood floor products. Darkens to a rich deep red. Cons: Difficult to cut due to hardness. Darkens with time.
Color: sapwood is gray-white; heartwood is salmon red to orange-brown when fresh, and becomes russet or reddish brown when seasoned; often marked with dark streaks. Grain: Mostly interlocked; texture is medium to rather course.
Availability: Readily
Hardness: Considerably harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: Dense and very strong.
Workability:
Sawing: Difficult due to high density, carbide tooling recommended.
Nailing: Good holding ability; due to hardness may require adjustment of angle of penetration and/or height.
Sanding: Well
Finishing: No known problems.





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PINE

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(Jatoba) Pros: Can be used over radiant heat very stable with humidity changes. One of the hardest wood floor products. Darkens to a rich deep red. Cons: Difficult to cut due to hardness. Darkens with time.
Color: sapwood is gray-white; heartwood is salmon red to orange-brown when fresh, and becomes russet or reddish brown when seasoned; often marked with dark streaks. Grain: Mostly interlocked; texture is medium to rather course.
Availability: Readily
Hardness: Considerably harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: Dense and very strong.
Workability:
Sawing: Difficult due to high density, carbide tooling recommended.
Nailing: Good holding ability; due to hardness may require adjustment of angle of penetration and/or height.
Sanding: Well
Finishing: No known problems.





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OAK

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(Jatoba) Pros: Can be used over radiant heat very stable with humidity changes. One of the hardest wood floor products. Darkens to a rich deep red. Cons: Difficult to cut due to hardness. Darkens with time.
Color: sapwood is gray-white; heartwood is salmon red to orange-brown when fresh, and becomes russet or reddish brown when seasoned; often marked with dark streaks. Grain: Mostly interlocked; texture is medium to rather course.
Availability: Readily
Hardness: Considerably harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: Dense and very strong.
Workability:
Sawing: Difficult due to high density, carbide tooling recommended.
Nailing: Good holding ability; due to hardness may require adjustment of angle of penetration and/or height.
Sanding: Well
Finishing: No known problems.





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AUSTRALIAN CYPRESS

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(Callitris glauca) Pros: Extremely durable, gives a nice rustic look with a warm glow.
Cons: Expensive.
Color: Sapwood is cream colored; heartwood is honey-gold to brown with darker knots throughout.
Grain: Closed
Availability: Limited
Hardness: Slightly harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: Excellent
Workability:
Sawing: Good
Nailing: Can be brittle, splits easily.
Sanding: Satisfactorily
Finishing: No known problems.





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MAHOGANY

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(White) (Quercus alba) Pros: The best value for your money. Very hard and durable also can be stained in a multiple of colors.
Cons: Slightly dark in coloring, can have large contrast in color from board to board especially in the lower grades.
Color: Heartwood is light brown; some boards may have a pinkish tint or a slight grayish cast. Sapwood is white to cream.
Grain: Open, with longer rays than red oak. Occasional crotches, swirls and burls. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger oak, tiger rays, or butterflies.
Availability: Commodity item, available in ALL types, styles and sizes of flooring.
Hardness: Slightly harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: More durable than red oak. Tannic acid in the wood protects it from fungi and insects.
Workability:
Sawing: good
Nailing: good
Sanding: satisfactory
Finishing: Absorbs finishes more evenly than red oak. Does NOT bleach well.





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PURPLEHEART

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(White) (Quercus alba) Pros: The best value for your money. Very hard and durable also can be stained in a multiple of colors.
Cons: Slightly dark in coloring, can have large contrast in color from board to board especially in the lower grades.
Color: Heartwood is light brown; some boards may have a pinkish tint or a slight grayish cast. Sapwood is white to cream.
Grain: Open, with longer rays than red oak. Occasional crotches, swirls and burls. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger oak, tiger rays, or butterflies.
Availability: Commodity item, available in ALL types, styles and sizes of flooring.
Hardness: Slightly harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: More durable than red oak. Tannic acid in the wood protects it from fungi and insects.
Workability:
Sawing: good
Nailing: good
Sanding: satisfactory
Finishing: Absorbs finishes more evenly than red oak. Does NOT bleach well.





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TEAK

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(Panga-panga, Millettia spp.) Pros: Great for feature strips.
Cons: Limited availability and expensive.
Color: Heartwood is yellow-brown when freshly cut,, turning dark brown to almost black with alternate layers of light and dark. Sapwood is yellowish-white and clearly demarcated from heartwood.
Grain: Straight when quartered; coarse texture.
Availability: Limited
Hardness: Quite a bit harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: average.
Workability:
Sawing: Difficult, carbide tooling recommended.
Nailing: Good
Sanding: Satisfactorily
Finishing: Some solvent-based stains do not dry well.





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WENGE

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(Panga-panga, Millettia spp.) Pros: Great for feature strips.
Cons: Limited availability and expensive.
Color: Heartwood is yellow-brown when freshly cut,, turning dark brown to almost black with alternate layers of light and dark. Sapwood is yellowish-white and clearly demarcated from heartwood.
Grain: Straight when quartered; coarse texture.
Availability: Limited
Hardness: Quite a bit harder than Northern red oak.
Durability: average.
Workability:
Sawing: Difficult, carbide tooling recommended.
Nailing: Good
Sanding: Satisfactorily
Finishing: Some solvent-based stains do not dry well.





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JANKA